Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Kosher Culinary Takes Manhattan: CKCA visits Renowned De Gustibus Cooking School




CKCA Chefs Phillippe Kaemmerle' and Avram Wiseman were proud to lead a Chanukah themed demonstration and tasting at DeGustibus, the world renowned cooking school at Macy's Herald Square. They were honored to join an elite club that has included some of the world's best chefs.


Chef Avram Wiseman presents his dish.
Chef Phillippe Kaemmerle' shows off his perfect plate.



The presentation was a homecoming for CKCA Director, Jesse Blonder, who started his career working as an assistant at De Gustibus. Returning to the school as a presenter marked a major milestone for him and for the school as a whole.

CKCA’s menu of all new items focused on upscale, but accessible Chanukah inspired cuisine that would be easy for attendees to replicate at home. The menu was as follows: 

Amuse Bouche
Baked Cinnamon Sugar Donuts with Warm Chocolate Soup


First Course
Smoked Trout with Raifort Sauce and 
Frisee & tarragon salad with comice pears, candied walnuts, radishes, & tarragon vinaigrette

Second Course
Portugese Kale & Potato Soup featuring Jack's Gourmet Beef Merguez Sausage

Main Course
Potato Crusted Chicken with white bean puree, sauteed spinach, tomato garlic confit, and baby squash.


Dessert
Almond stuffed baked lady apples / olive oil chocolate cake / autumn fruit stew / creme anglaise



CKCA would like to thank Sal Rizzo, proprietor of De Gustibus and their gracious, attentive staff. 

Look out for more events in the future! We are planning to collaborate with De Gustibus to do a hands-on class in the spring. 

From left to right, CKCA student Alex Trofimov, Chef Avram Wiseman,
CKCA graduate Menachem Freeman and Chef Philippe Kaemmerle.  

A note from a happy guest.

For more information, visit our website, www.kosherculinaryarts.com 
Give us a call! 718.758.1339
Email us: info@kosherculinaryarts.com

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The Center for Kosher Culinary Arts
1407 Coney Island Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11230



Thursday, December 11, 2014

Australian Chef Itta Werdiger Roth of Mason & Mug Shares Her Experiences in the Kosher Food World


Chef Itta at Mason & Mug

Originally from Australia, Executive Chef Itta Werdiger Roth is now one year into co-owning and cheffing at the renowned Mason & Mug Restaurant in Brooklyn. Read on to hear more about Chef Roth's path to success in the kosher food and hospitality industry. 

Number of years working in the (kosher) food business:
Eleven years

What other jobs have you had in the food business?
My first job ever was at an ice cream store as a teenager where we made our own waffle cones in Melbourne, Australia.  Years later I was randomly a mashgiacha and prep cook at an Israeli food festival. My first job in New York City was as a personal chef. I also ran a boutique catering company for a few years. I was an original Pardes employee, first as a server and then as a line cook. Most recently, I ran a really cool music based supper club called The Hester. 

What is the best way to describe your education in the culinary arts in the culinary arts and how that got you to where you are? 
I'm self-taught. I'm street smart, work hard and use my instincts in the kitchen. I read cookbooks as though they are novels. 

In one sentence, describe what you do in your current position.
I'm the chef at a “small plates” beer and wine bar. Small plates, means that we create several dishes and present them to our customers on small plates in a rustic and unpretentious way. I create the menus, cook the food, train others to cook the food, talk to purveyors, meet deliveries and deal with a lot of very small local companies, too many!

What do you find most rewarding about the work you do?
Seeing our customers enjoy themselves because of the unique restaurant  environment that my partner, Alexander (Sasha) Chack and I have  created. Alexander comes from the 92nd Street “Y” food and beverage venue in Tribeca.


Chef Itta giving a demo.
What do you find the most challenging?
Trying to pass on the specific vision of each dish and overall line setup to my cooks.

What is the most important lesson you ever learned on the job?
The importance of SPEAKING CLEARLY and SLOWLY and being super organized. Also, having a really good, but simple prep-list always in motion on my gorgeous white board!

What is the most bizarre thing that ever happened to you on the job?
Crazy stuff happens all the time but nothing ever surprises me. One time I accidentally let some crack addict clean the windows! My skirt has fallen down and my hat has come on the line and a million things have flown out of my hands and splattered everywhere during a rush. 

What are you passions outside of cooking / baking?
Hanging with my family, live music, cycling, skiing and swimming in the ocean.

What do you want to be known for in the culinary world?
The girl who made a bar kosher or maybe something related to my pilgrimage to introduce different veggies to Americans and to get them to eat way more of 'em.

Describe the best meal you have ever had.
That's really hard. I've eaten a lot of really good food. But to be honest, I started cooking because I wanted to eat my own food my own way so it is a toss up between the yuuuum Spaghetti Bolognese I've been making with Grow and Behold ground beef and chicken liver with wine...or a kind of macro bowl with short grain brown rice, kimchi, a mixture of warm veggies like kabocha squash and kale with brewer's yeast, brags, hot sauce and toasted sesame seeds. Looks gorgeous, tastes great and is so good for you too.

What advice do you have for someone interested in becoming a chef?
This job is for you if you know how and want to work really hard, like 14 hour days on you feet and, if you know its not truly beneath you to do anything and everything that is involved in running a kitchen. If you love eating and enjoy serving people with a great passion, this job is for you.

How do you think kosher food will change over the next 5 years? 10 years?
It will keep following the rest of the hip food world I guess, with more natural, seasonal, wholesome and local ingredients. Hopefully, the kosher world and Americans will grow out of all the fat free foods. The growth rate of diabetes and obesity has grown so much -- what does that teach us exactly? Do I have to spell it out?

Chef Itta at Kosherfest 2014

FLASH QUESTIONS 
Favorite Food to Eat? My "macro bowl" of brown rice, kimchi, warm veggies, brags, hot sauce and toasted sesame seeds.
Favortie Cookbook?
The Flexitarian Table written by Peter Berley.
Favorite Cooking Show/ Celeb Chef? I don't watch reality TV and competitions, but competing in Kosherfest 2014 was a lot of fun.
Favorite Kitchen Tool? Other than a sharp knife, hmm the food processor is very helpful and I use a Microplane  for many things.  



Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Chef David Blum of Hartman's Fine Kosher Foods in Toronto Shares His Approach to Cooking Kosher Across the Canadian Border

Chef David Blum, Executive Chef at Hartmans Fine Kosher Foods in Canada, was a fierce competitor at this year’s Kosherfest competition. He fired up the contest with his bold flavors and colorful plating.

CKCA spoke to Chef Blum about what fuels him in the kitchen, his culinary passions, and the future of the kosher food industry.




Describe your culinary education?
I attended culinary school in Jerusalem at the Jerusalem Culinary Institute, which unfortunately closed. I then returned to Toronto and received my diploma from George Browns' Food and Beverage Management two-year program where I learned about business and operations which are essential to running the “front of house.”


What were your first jobs in the food business?
When I was sixteen I had a summer job at Joe Boo's Cookoo's in Toronto manning the fire pit which was surrounded by a revolving wall of roasting chickens!  My second job was at Umami's Sushi while I was studying at George Brown. I worked in the dairy kitchen taking advantage of every opportunity to work as an apprentice to the sushi chefs.

In one sentence describe what you do in your current position.
I manage and operate the kitchens for Hartmans, executing our large line of prepared foods, retail items, frozen foods, catering, and pop-up restaurant.

What do you find most rewarding about your work?
Seeing the smile on a customer’s face who is able to find everything she needs for a last minute dinner party. After 15 minutes of shopping she is all set and I know that my job has been well done. 

Second, I must share the moments that helped build my passion for working in the culinary industry. I love smelling the freshly opened truffles from Italy, getting the first taste of two-month dried charcuterie, grilling off beef “bacon” wrapped Kobe ribeye, arranging hamachi tartar for a photo shoot, stuffing a cornish hen with foie gras for roasting, loading up my smoker with beef ribs and hickory wood... I could go on and on!  Many of my friends with other careers are totally jealous of what I do for a living.


What do you find most challenging/frustrating?
I have a profound hearing loss and rely completely on my cochlear implant. Working in a noisy environment can be challenging. It has been said that deaf people have a heightened sense of taste and smell which certainly works to my advantage.

What is the most important lesson you've learned on the job?
Many chefs have big egos. To be a successful chef you need to handle your ego carefully. I trained in Japanese kitchens where there is the highest level of respect for the chef or trainee. I apply that attitude to my workplace and expect that from my cooks.

What is the most bizarre thing that ever happened to you on the job?
I was executing a wedding for 450 guests with a staff of 33 workers. My cochlear implant hearing aid broke early on during service and honestly, I could not hear a thing.  I had a full staff waiting for orders and hungry guests expecting food. I quickly pulled a wait staffer to be my personal interpreter for the evening – standing by my side at all times. The end result?  Everyone was pleased and there were no hiccups. Funny enough, after dessert the bride’s brother who was also deaf found me in the kitchen to offer a spare hearing aid!

What are you passions outside of cooking / baking?
I’m an avid car enthusiast - classic cars and sports cars. For my birthday, my wife bought me an hour of driving a Ferrari at the racetrack.

What do you want to be known for in the culinary world?
I wish there was a James Beard award for the kosher world. It would be a dream for me to win that award and to be recognized for my work in the kosher food industry.

Describe the best meal you ever had.
I went to my wife’s family moshav where friends invite you for a full day barbecue rather than just one meal. There were forty of us and we used a grill the size of a ping-pong table. We grilled up cow brain, duck liver, lamb chops, fillet mignon and other kosher cuts, which are unavailable to us in North America. Dessert was an empty plate and a knife with an invitation to cut right "off the vine" from the family farm. We helped ourselves to passion fruit, raspberries, persimmon, watermelon and other sun bathed fruits. Their approach to simple farmer style cooking was by far the most enjoyable meal I’ve ever had.


What advice do you have for someone who is interested in working as a chef?
You need to LOVE it in order to last. If you find gutting a fish tolerable and interesting then you are in the right career. Also, culinary students and chefs need to stay in good shape and exercise since the kitchen is a physically demanding environment. Understand the difference between "eating" and "tasting" so you can avoid overeating.  


FLASH QUESTIONS!

Favorite food to eat?  My wife’s cholent
Favorite food to cook? Charcoal grilled fish
Favorite Cookbook? Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi 
Favorite Cooking Show / Celeb Chef? Chuck Hughes of Montreal
Favorite kitchen tool? My beloved zester

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Kosherfest 2014 Wrap-Up

Many thanks to our current students, staff and all the alumni and chefs who came to visit us at Kosherfest this year!

The Center for Kosher Culinary Arts was proud to exhibit at Kosherfest for the sixth consecutive year. Our current students had a blast, and we were excited to see many of our alumni attend the show.

One of the highlights of the event was the Kosherfest Culinary Competition, produced by CKCA for the fourth consecutive year. All the dishes were delicious and visually magnificent, but the top prize went to Chef Tanajbe of Mexikosher.

We want to thank our co-sponsor Jack's Gourmet, our host Paula Shoyer (The Holiday Kosher Baker) and our judges, Chef Philippe Kaemmerlé (The Center for Kosher Culinary Arts); Jack Silberstein (Jack's Gourmet); and Naomi Nachman (Host "Table for Two" Nachum Segal Network). 
Chef Itta Werdiger Roth ( Mason & Mug), Chef Katsuji Tanabe ( Mexikosher) & Chef David Blum (Hartmans). 

Plates from left to right: Chef Itta Werdiger Roth, Chef Katsuji Tanabe (winner!), Chef David Blum. 
Kosherfest provides a great opportunity for our chefs, students and alumni to meet and network with leading purveyors in the kosher food industry. We are excited to be involved in an event that helps foster a kosher food community and look forward to seeing you next year at our booth!


Thursday, November 13, 2014

CKCA Announces the launch of Koshercareers.com


The Center for Kosher Culinary Arts is excited to announce the official launch of KosherCareers.com, the fist job site targeted toward employers and job seekers in the kosher food industry. The site provides a focused avenue for qualified applicants and employers to make the perfect career match and eliminates the hassle of having to sift through jobs that are not "kosher" enough. 

Employers: 
Post your job free of charge. You will instantly get traffic from qualified, professionally trained chefs. We direct many alumni to the site, so we can personally vouch for their training in kosher food preparation. 

Job Seekers: 
Create a profile and gain instant exposure to a wide range of kosher companies. All postings and job listings have been vetted by a CKCA staff member, so you will find a curated list of positions that fit your needs.


Koshercareers Features Opportunities in All Areas of the Food Business Including:  

Food Service 
Restaurants, Catering, Bakeries & Cake Decoration, Schools & Camps, Nursing Homes & Assisted Living, Supermarkets & Take Out, Hospitality Management.

Personal Chef Work 

Kosher Supervision

Food Manufacturing & Distribution 
Product & Recipe Development, Production, Distribution, Purchasing.

Marketing & Media 
Food Writing, Food Styling, Photography, Blogging.

KosherCareers.com provides an easy solution for those looking to follow their passion in the kosher food world. Employers are sure to find the applicant they are looking for!


Follow us!
Instagram @koshercareers, Twitter @kosherculinary and online koshercareers.com
Post a picture if you know a Kosher Professional with #KosherCareers and we'll feature you!

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Kosher Baking Guru Paula Shoyer Talks About Her Passion for All Things Baking

Paula Shoyer, a household name in the kosher baking world, is a prolific cookbook author and pastry chef. This year she will be CKCA’s Master of Ceremonies at the 7th annual Kosherfest Chef Competition on November 12th. During her busy book tour for “The Holiday Kosher Baker,” we grabbed the opportunity to spend time with Paula to learn how she became a kosher baking guru.
What kind of professional training do you have?
In 1996, while I was living in Switzerland and studying at the well-known French cooking school Ritz Escoffier in Paris, I received a degree in French Pastry Arts. I wanted to learn how to cook and bake better, not as a career move but purely for fun so I pursued pastry arts since it was easier kashrut-wise.  

How long have you been working in the kosher food business?
Since 1996.

How did you start out and what was your first job in the kosher food world?
I started working while still in school doing catering jobs as well as desserts and special occasion cakes in Geneva.  I started a business called Paula’s Parisian Pastries, taught baking classes and edited two cookbooks for well known author, Susie Fishbein of the kosher cookbook series Kosher By Design.

In one sentence, describe your current role in the kosher food industry?
I am a cookbook author, freelance writer, cooking and baking teacher and a kosher baking consultant.
What do you find most rewarding about your work?
I make people happy and I feel that I am improving the quality of kosher desserts everywhere.

What do you find to be most challenging as a well-known pastry arts chef?
The constant testing and retesting of recipes until I am truly satisfied with the results.  My approach is -- if I have an idea, I’ll keep working on it faithfully until I achieve my goal.

What is the most important lesson you’ve learned in your career?
Never take a “no” too personally and keep moving forward. Know in your heart that if you do what you love, something really good will come of it.

What is the most bizarre thing that has ever happened to you on the job?
Two years ago I competed on the Food Network’s “Sweet Genius”. I thought I was truly ready for the show, but surprisingly I felt awkward being on TV. It was surreal being on air and not just a viewer.
What are your passions outside of baking and cooking?
My family and I love traveling.

What do you want to be known for in the baking and culinary world?
I hope to be known for improving the quality of kosher-parve desserts served in people’s home, bakeries and by caterers.

Where did you have your best meal (outside of your own home of course)?
At Tierra Sur, the restaurant at the Herzog winery in California.

What advise do you have for someone interested in becoming a kosher chef?
Find an area where you can contribute something new or unique and be open to new opportunities. If you believe people are settling for lower standards in kosher, don’t be satisfied. Also, push hard for natural ingredients.
How do you think kosher food will change over the next 5 to 10 years?
I’m hoping that parve products will become healthier and more natural.  I’d love for bakeries to get back to artisan baking and to stop using commercial tasteless ingredients to assemble baked goods.  Let’s hope that bakeries will look like the parve bakeries of Paris, such as Contini and Le XXV.

FLASH QUESTIONS
~ Favorite food?  Fried Chicken.
~ Favorite food to cook?  Inventing new soups and baking French tarts.
~ Favorite cooking show or celebrity chef? I’m a huge fan of Martha Stewart (she’s done Teshuva), her recipes are accessible and I use her books as resources.
~ Favorite kitchen tool? The silicone spatula.
~ Your best tip for successful baking? Read through the entire recipe before you start and be sure to measure properly.


Be sure to check out Paula Shoyer's cookbook “The Holiday KOSHER BAKER”, and her upcoming release for 2015, “The New PASSOVER MENU”!